njspt0099_luchange.shp: New Jersey 2000/1999 Land Use Change Using SPOTView Panchromatic (black&white) 10-meter Resolution Statewide Composite Satellite Imagery

Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA)
Publication_Date: 2004
Title:
njspt0099_luchange.shp: New Jersey 2000/1999 Land Use Change Using SPOTView Panchromatic (black&white) 10-meter Resolution Statewide Composite Satellite Imagery
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data
Series_Information:
Series_Name: Project: New Jersey Land Use Updates 2000/1999
Publication_Information:
Publication_Place:
Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Publisher:
Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Other_Citation_Details:
This bulk of this work was funded by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Additional funding was provided by the U.S. Forest Service, the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve and the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.
Online_Linkage: <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/projects/lc/>
Larger_Work_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College - Rutgers University
Title:
Landscape Change Program at CRSSA: New Jersey Land Use Updates 2000/1999
Online_Linkage: <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/projects/lc/>
Description:
Abstract:
As reflected in Year 2000 Census data, New Jersey continues to increase in population. Accompanying that population growth has been significant changes to New Jersey's landscape. To accommodate this growth, housing developments and shopping malls encroach on lands that were formerly farm fields and forests. The rapid pace of development and land use change has resulted in a high demand for updated land use/land cover data to inform ongoing land use planning and growth management programs within New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and other state and local agencies. The objective of this research was to use medium scale satellite imagery (i.e., 10 meter spatial resolution SPOT Panchromatic imagery) to provide a consistent mapping of newly developed urban lands as of Year 2000 across the state, while exploring the applicability of using less-costly satellite imagery as a means to update NJDEP's air-photo based land use data. As a supplement to the research, the report, 'Measuring Land Use Change Change in New Jersey: Land Use Update to Year 2000' (Lathrop, CRSSA, 2004), is an assessment of the major trends in the land use changes occurring between 1995/1997 and Year 2000. This project provides an update to earlier work examining urban growth and land use change occurring between 1986 and 1995/1997 which was based on air-photo interpreted data for both time periods (Hasse and Lathrop, 2001).

Our focus was identifying and mapping land areas that have gone from a non-developed to a developed or transitional state (and transitional state to developed) subsequent to the New Jersey statewide LU/LC mapping previously undertaken for the 1995/1997 time period. SPOTView 10m PAN USA Select imagery acquired during the 1999-2000 time period was used as the primary data source to map this change. The SPOTView imagery (10meter spatial resolution) was a mosaic of multiple terrain-corrected scenes acquired over the 1999 to 2000 time period with a majority of the imagery from 2000. While the SPOT 2000 black&white imagery does not have the same high spatial and spectral resolution as the original 1995/1997 digital orthophotography, it's comparatively low cost and ready availability made a Year 2000 LU/LC update economically feasible.

The overall trends revealed in the 2000 land use update show that New Jersey's urban development continues at a pace comparable with the 1986 to 1995 time period. The statistically adjusted estimate for the overall change in new urban land between 1995 and 2000 is approximately 77,940 (+/- 17,920 acres), representing an increase of urban land of approximately 5.8%. Adding in new transitional and barren lands, the total developed land change is approximately 89,880 (+/- 16,530 acres).

Please read all metadata documentation for this data layer for process steps, data error analysis, etc, etc.

Purpose:
To map residential, commercial, recreational, and transitional land use change across New Jersey using 10 meter spatial resolution SPOT panchromatic (black&white) satellite image composites. The mapped updates were analyzed with 1995/97 NJDEP land use / land cover data and the results documented in the CRSSA report, 'Measuring Land Use Change in New Jersey: Land Use Update to Year 2000' (Lathrop, 2004, CRSSA report# 17-2004-1) as well as 'New Jersey Land Use / Land Cover Update: 2000/2001'. Both reports are available at <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/projects/lc/> .
Supplemental_Information:
- For results of the study, please refer to the reports 'Measuring Land Use Change in New Jersey: Land Use Update to Year 2000' (Lathrop, 2004, CRSSA report# 17-2004-1) as well as 'New Jersey Land Use / Land Cover Update: 2000/2001'. The reports will be made available on CRSSA's Landscape Change Research web site at <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/projects/lc/> .

- About the analysis results documented in the CRSSA report: Although this update compares data generated by different imaging technologies (higher resolution aerial photo-based data from 1995/97 with lower resolution satellite imagery from 2000), this analysis focuses on the relative patterns of change in New Jersey over time. Thus, results are provided taking error among the data sets into account. While the accuracy of the overall urban and transitional change area estimates was statistically evaluated, the statistical confidence in the conversion of specific categories of land (e.g., forest, farmland or wetland) was not separately evaluated. Thus the total acreage amounts or change rates for forest, farmland and wetland conversion as enumerated in the report should be considered as initial estimates. Subsequent to initiation of this research, NJDEP committed additional resources to updating its air-photo based data with 2002 aerial photography. Upon completion of this aerial-photo interpretation and land use/land cover classification, we expect to conduct further analyses to ascertain additional and more refined rates of land use change for New Jersey.

- Shape file content has changed slightly in preparation for data dissemination.

- These data may change as needed, please check back in the future for any notices.

- Please read all metadata.

Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Multiple_Dates/Times:
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 2000
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 1999
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 1998 (very small portion of state)
Currentness_Reference:
ground condition: SPOT Image Corp. compiled best available to Yr 2000; the result is a composite of various dates of panchromatic (black&white) imagery across New Jersey
Status:
Progress: Complete
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: As needed
Spatial_Domain:
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -75.548230
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -73.914439
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 41.349885
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 38.928693
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword: land use
Theme_Keyword: development
Theme_Keyword: landscape change
Theme_Keyword: SPOT satellite
Theme_Keyword: satellite imagery
Theme_Keyword: panchromatic
Theme_Keyword: medium resolution
Theme_Keyword: CRSSA
Place:
Place_Keyword: New Jersey
Place_Keyword: USA
Temporal:
Temporal_Keyword: 2000
Temporal_Keyword: 1999
Temporal_Keyword: 1998
Access_Constraints: See 'Use Constraints'.
Use_Constraints:
While efforts have been made to ensure that these data are accurate and reliable, the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis, Rutgers University, cannot assume liability for any damages, or misrepresentations, caused by any inaccuracies in the data, or as a result of the data to be used on a particular system. Rutgers University makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, data will credit the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University.

Terms of Use:

The user agrees to abide by the following terms of use:

1. The Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College, Rutgers University, disseminates this data layer as-is and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty.
2. CRSSA, Rutgers University, will not be held responsible to further maintain the disseminated data, nor to provide the data in different formats other than its current availability.
3. Be aware that due to the panchromatic nature and limited spatial resolution of the SPOT imagery (i.e. black and white, rather than the color infrared and 10 x 10 m grid cell resolution rather than the 1 x 1 m resolution provided by the 1995/1997 digital orthophotography) only generalized categories of developed land uses could be interpreted. Due to limited positional accuracy of the SPOT imagery these polygonal data should not be used for site-specific analysis.
4. Please read all composed metadata documentation for important data information.
5. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing this raster grid will credit the original author(s) as listed in the metadata (citation) as well as the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University.

Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Richard G. Lathrop
Contact_Organization:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Contact_Position: Director
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address: Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Building
Address: Cook College, Rutgers University
Address: 14 College Farm Road
City: New Brunswick
State_or_Province: New Jersey
Postal_Code: 08901-8551
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 732 932 1582
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 732 932 2587
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: lathrop@crssa.rutgers.edu
Hours_of_Service: M-F 8.30AM-4.30PM EST USA
Data_Set_Credit:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University
Native_Data_Set_Environment:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Version 5.1 (Build 2600) Service Pack 1; ESRI ArcCatalog 8.3.0.800
Cross_Reference:
Citation_Information:
Publication_Date: 2004
Title:
Reports: 'Measuring Land Use Change in New Jersey: Land Use Update to Year 2000' (CRSSA) and 'New Jersey Land Use / Land Cover Update: 2000/2001' (CRSSA/NJDEP)
Online_Linkage: <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/>
Online_Linkage: <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/projects/lc>
Larger_Work_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Series_Information:
Series_Name: Landscape Change Research Program at CRSSA
Publication_Information:
Publisher: CRSSA

Data_Quality_Information:
Attribute_Accuracy:
Attribute_Accuracy_Report:
Please also refer to the error analysis text in the report(s), 'Measuring Land Use Change in New Jersey' (Lathrop, 2004, CRSSA report# 17-2004-1) and 'New Jersey Land Use / Land Cover Update 2000/2001' at <http://crssa.rutgers.edu/projects/lc/> .

Error Analysis

To assess the accuracy of the satellite image interpretation and land use (LU) mapping, an extensive statewide field campaign was conducted. A sample of 684 polygonal areas identified in the mapping as LU change were visited in the field to verify their status. The sites were located in the field using a laptop computer linked with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Field notes and digital ground photos were taken for each field reference point. 638 locations interpreted as undergoing a classifiable land use change (i.e., one of the 8 land use change categories above, not Unclassified) were field checked. Of these 638 locations, 581 were correctly interpreted as undergoing the right category of land use change (i.e. new residential land use), giving an accuracy of 91%. An additional 46 field checked polygons interpreted as "unclassified" land use change type were also field checked. Of these 46 locations, 38 were correctly interpreted as undergoing land use change (in that the land use had changed from 1995/97), giving an accuracy of 83%.

In addition to the field checking, a separate accuracy assessment was conducted using high resolution (approximately 1m GRC) panchromatic orthophotography acquired during the spring of 2000 by the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. Imagery was available for the counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Mercer, Ocean and Salem counties, representing approximately one half of the state's land area. This digital imagery was loaned to CRSSA for this accuracy assessment purpose. 62 orthophotographic tiles (each tile was approximately 1,015 acres in size) were selected using a stratified random sampling design, representing slightly more than 2% of the DVRPC imaged area. The SPOT-derived land use map was stratified into low, medium, high and highest change areas and an approximately equal number of tiles were randomly from each class. Each tile was then interpreted by a skilled photo-interpreter using this same methods and classification scheme as that used for the SPOT imagery. The resulting aerial photo interpreted land use change estimates were then compared with the SPOT-derived estimates. Due to differences in the dates of the SPOT vs. DVRPC imagery, some areas of change show up in one set of imagery and not the other. For example, land use change that occurred subsequent to Spring 2000 (the date of DVRPC imagery) is apparent in the SPOT imagery acquired several months later in 2000. These areas were identified and excluded from the comparison.

The total area of new urban and transitional/barren land estimated from the SPOT interpreted maps was 1983 acres as compared to 1895 acres estimated from the reference aerial photography which equates to an overestimate of slightly below 5%. The relative accuracy of the estimation of urban vs. transitional land was evaluated separately. The total area of new urban land estimated from the SPOT interpreted maps was 1263 acres as compared to 1345 acres estimated from the reference aerial photography which equates to an underestimate of approximately 9%. Accurate interpretation and detailed delineation of transitional lands in agricultural land settings can be difficult with the SPOT imagery. Due to this difficulty in interpretation, there appeared to be an overestimation of transitional land. The total area of new transitional land estimated from the SPOT interpreted maps was 719 acres as compared to 554 acres estimated from the reference aerial photography which equates to an overestimate of slightly below 30%. Approximately one half of the difference between the two estimates was due to the over/under estimate of transitional land in three tiles. Some discrepancy in the individual Urban and Transitional assessments is due to the interpretation of newly developing areas that were classified as urban in the DVRPC and transitional in the SPOT imagery and vice versa. Thus the larger discrepancies in the individual Urban and Transitional assessments are balanced out in the combined assessment, resulting in an overall lower error.

Based on the above comparison between the SPOT and the DVRPC reference imagery land use estimates, a ratio estimation technique (Shiver and Border, 1996) was applied to determine a 95% confidence interval around the overall estimated land use change. The ratio estimation and confidence intervals were calibrated for the nine county accuracy assessment sub-area and then extrapolated to the state-wide land use change estimates. Overall, the 2000 LU Update was deemed to be sufficiently accurate for us to be confident in the estimates of land use change based on these mapped data for use in analyzing county to regional trends. The above accuracy assessment only examined the attribute accuracy of the interpretation and not the spatial accuracy of the mapped boundaries. Due to the coarser spatial resolution of the SPOT imagery, there is error in the mapped land use change polygon boundaries. The stated positional accuracy of the SPOTView Imagery is 12 meters or better with 90% confidence. Comparison of the SPOT-digitized boundaries with the higher resolution DVRPC reference imagery showed discrepancies on the order of up to 20 to 30 meters in a horizontal direction, thus caution should be employed in using the 2000 Land Use Update GIS data for more site-specific assessments.

While the accuracy of the overall urban and transitional change area estimates were statistically evaluated, the statistical confidence in the conversion of specific categories of land (e.g., forest, farmland or wetland) were not separately evaluated. Thus the total acreage amounts or change rates for forest, farmland and wetland conversion as enumerated in this report should be considered as initial estimates. Once the sub-meter statewide digital orthophotography acquired in 2002 are interpreted and digitized (scheduled for completion in 2005-2006), a more comprehensive and detailed analysis will be undertaken and more refined estimates of urban growth and land use change will be feasible.

Rate of New Development

Determining the rate of new development as an acreage amount per year is not straightforward because there were not two simple Time 1 and Time 2 endpoints in time. For the Time 1 endpoint (i.e. the NJDEP LU/LC), part of the state was mapped in 1995 and part in 1997. Approximately, 11,000 acres (or 10.9%) of the changed land use area and 8,400 acres (or 11.1%) of new urban is for the 1997 DOQ mapped area; so instead of a 5 year figure in the denominator, 3 years could be used instead, thereby increasing the rate of change for those areas of the state. The SPOT imagery ranged in date from 4/071998 to 12/05/2000. As the majority of the imagery was from year 2000, a 2000 date was used as the Time 2 endpoint. Due to the geographic variation in the Time 1 and 2 endpoints, one must recognize the uncertainty in the rate estimates that is difficult to quantify. Due to this uncertainty a change threshold of +/- 25% was used to account for a margin of error in ascertaining whether a trend in the annual conversion rate was relatively unchanged or significantly higher or lower.

Positional_Accuracy:
Horizontal_Positional_Accuracy:
Horizontal_Positional_Accuracy_Report:
The stated positional accuracy of the SPOTView Imagery by SPOT Image Corporation is +/- 12 meters or better with 90% confidence. Comparison of the SPOT-digitized boundaries with the higher resolution reference imagery showed discrepancies on the order of up to 20 to 30 meters in a horizontal direction, thus caution should be employed in using the 2000 Land Use Update GIS data for more site-specific assessments.
Lineage:
Source_Information:
Source_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: SPOT Image Corporation
Publication_Date: 2001
Title: 10 m Pan USA Select: New Jersey
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: remote-sensing image
Online_Linkage: <http://www.spot.com>
Source_Scale_Denominator: 10 meter ground spatial resolution
Type_of_Source_Media: CD-ROM
Source_Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Multiple_Dates/Times:
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 2000
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 1999
Single_Date/Time:
Calendar_Date: 1998
Source_Currentness_Reference: ground condition
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Methods

Land Use Interpretation and Mapping

A combination of satellite imagery, digital orthophotography, and existing (LU/LC) data sets were used to map land use change. Our focus in this respect was identifying and mapping land areas that have gone from a non-developed to a developed or transitional state subsequent to the New Jersey statewide LU/LC mapping previously undertaken for the 1995/1997 time period. SPOTView 10m PAN USA Select imagery acquired during the 1999-2000 time period was used as the primary data source to map this change. The SPOTView imagery was a mosaic of multiple terrain-corrected scenes acquired over the 1999 to 2000 time period with a majority of the imagery from 2000. While the SPOT 2000 imagery does not have the same high spatial and spectral resolution as the original 1995/1997 digital orthophotography, it's comparatively low cost and ready availability made a Year 2000 LU/LC update economically feasible.

The 1995/1997 NJDEP Land Use/Land Cover data (NJDEP, 2000) was overlaid on the above imagery and areas of change (subsequent to 1995/1997) were interpreted and digitized on-screen using the ArcView and ERDAS Imagine software. Areas of change include those areas that have gone from a natural land cover to developed land use or transitional to developed. Areas of change were classified into the following categories: Residential, Mixed: Commercial/Service/Industrial, Recreational, Extractive Mining, Transitional, Agriculture, Other Agriculture (new structures, other land use changes), Water, Unclassified.

Due to the panchromatic nature and limited spatial resolution of the SPOT imagery (i.e., i.e. black and white, rather than the color IR and 10 x 10 m grid cell resolution rather than the 1 x 1 m resolution provided by the 1995/1997 digital orthophotography) only these generalized categories of developed land uses could be interpreted. Not all possible land use changes were mapped. For example, the abandonment of agricultural fields to scrub/shrub or forest was not mapped. In addition, there was an Unclassified category, i.e., the land use appeared to change but the category of that change could not be discerned. A minimum mapping unit of approximately 1 acre was imposed (i.e. a tract of new development had to be at least 1 acre in size to be interpreted and mapped).

The photo interpretation was undertaken by trained staff, graduate and post-baccalaureate students. The resulting SPOT-based interpretation was then quality checked by the Principal Investigator, R. Lathrop, using additional imagery for reference. Leaf-on and leaf-off Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery (September 12, 2001 and December 1, 2001, respectively) were used for additional reference in checking omission and commission errors in the interpretation.

Process_Date: '02, '03 digitization/interpretation
Process_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Organization:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College - Rutgers University
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 732 932 1582
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 732 932 2587
Hours_of_Service: M-F 8.30AM - 4.30PM EST USA
Process_Step:
Process_Description: Dataset copied.
Source_Used_Citation_Abbreviation: Z:\lc2000\arc\out\3rd\njspt0099_luchange

Spatial_Data_Organization_Information:
Direct_Spatial_Reference_Method: Vector
Point_and_Vector_Object_Information:
SDTS_Terms_Description:
SDTS_Point_and_Vector_Object_Type: G-polygon
Point_and_Vector_Object_Count: 11985

Spatial_Reference_Information:
Horizontal_Coordinate_System_Definition:
Planar:
Grid_Coordinate_System:
Grid_Coordinate_System_Name: Universal Transverse Mercator
Universal_Transverse_Mercator:
UTM_Zone_Number: 18
Transverse_Mercator:
Scale_Factor_at_Central_Meridian: 0.999600
Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -75.000000
Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0.000000
False_Easting: 500000.000000
False_Northing: 0.000000
Planar_Coordinate_Information:
Planar_Coordinate_Encoding_Method: coordinate pair
Coordinate_Representation:
Abscissa_Resolution: 0.000512
Ordinate_Resolution: 0.000512
Planar_Distance_Units: meters
Geodetic_Model:
Horizontal_Datum_Name: North American Datum of 1983
Ellipsoid_Name: Geodetic Reference System 80
Semi-major_Axis: 6378137.000000
Denominator_of_Flattening_Ratio: 298.257222

Entity_and_Attribute_Information:
Detailed_Description:
Entity_Type:
Entity_Type_Label: njspt0099_luchange
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: FID
Attribute_Definition: Internal feature number.
Attribute_Definition_Source: ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain:
Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: Shape
Attribute_Definition: Feature geometry.
Attribute_Definition_Source: ESRI
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Unrepresentable_Domain: Coordinates defining the features.
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: AREA
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: PERIMETER
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: LU0099
Attribute_Definition: land use code
Attribute:
Attribute_Label: LABEL0099
Attribute_Definition: land use descriptions
Attribute_Domain_Values:
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 111
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Residential
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 112
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Commercial/Service/Industrial/Institutional/Mixed
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 118
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Recreational land
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 121
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Crop/agriculture
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 124
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Other agriculture (e.g. structures)
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 173
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Extractive mining
Enumerated_Domain:
Enumerated_Domain_Value: 175
Enumerated_Domain_Value_Definition: Transitional land
Attribute_Value_Accuracy_Information:
Attribute_Value_Accuracy: See 'Attribute Accuracy'
Overview_Description:

Distribution_Information:
Resource_Description:
spotimg0099_njlu_upd.shp: New Jersey 2000/1999 Land Use Updates Using SPOTView Panchromatic (black&white) 10-meter Resolution Statewide Composite Satellite Imagery --PLEASE READ ALL METADATA FOR PROCESS STEPS, ERROR ANALYSIS, ETC!!
Distribution_Liability:
While efforts have been made to ensure that these data are accurate and reliable, the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis, Rutgers University, cannot assume liability for any damages, or misrepresentations, caused by any inaccuracies in the data, or as a result of the data to be used on a particular system. Rutgers University makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University, data will credit the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University.

Terms of Use:

The user agrees to abide by the following terms of use:

1. The Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College, Rutgers University, disseminates this data layer as-is and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty.
2. CRSSA, Rutgers University, will not be held responsible to further maintain the disseminated data, nor to provide the data in different formats other than its current availability.
3. Be aware that due to the panchromatic nature and limited spatial resolution of the SPOT imagery (i.e. black and white, rather than the color infrared and 10 x 10 m grid cell resolution rather than the 1 x 1 m resolution provided by the 1995/1997 digital orthophotography) only generalized categories of developed land uses could be interpreted. Due to limited positional accuracy of the SPOT imagery these polygonal data should not be used for site-specific analysis.
4. Please read all composed metadata documentation for important data information.
5. Any maps, publications, reports or any other type of document produced as a result of an associated project utilizing this raster grid will credit the original author(s) as listed in the metadata (citation) as well as the Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Rutgers University.

Standard_Order_Process:
Digital_Form:
Digital_Transfer_Information:
Transfer_Size: 6.902

Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20040608
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Organization_Primary:
Contact_Organization:
Grant F. Walton Center for Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), Cook College - Rutgers University
Contact_Person: Richard G. Lathrop
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: mailing and physical address
Address: Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Building
Address: 14 College Farm Road
City: New Brunswick
State_or_Province: New Jersey
Postal_Code: 08901-8551
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 732 932 1582
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 732 932 2587
Hours_of_Service: M-F 8.30AM - 4.30PM EST USA
Metadata_Standard_Name: FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001-1998
Metadata_Time_Convention: local time
Metadata_Extensions:
Online_Linkage: <http://www.esri.com/metadata/esriprof80.html>
Profile_Name: ESRI Metadata Profile

Generated by mp version 2.7.33 on Tue Jun 08 14:10:00 2004